Share your thoughts on the review of hospital services

South Yorkshire and Bassetlaw has some really good hospitals and some great care. But healthcare has changed a lot since the NHS was first set up and because of this we need to change the way in which some of our services work.

We need to be able to make sure we can give good care to everyone.

A team of people have carried out a review. This review looked at all of our services and has made recommendations on changes they think we could make to some of our hospital services.

We are not closing any local hospitals in Barnsley, Bassetlaw, Chesterfield, Doncaster, Rotherham or Sheffield.

But we may need to change the way some services work.

We think that if we work together then we will be able to solve some of the problems our hospitals have. We have written some of our ideas below and we would like to know what you think.

1.Working together:

We are looking at ways that we could work together. We think it might be useful to:

  • Work together to recruit and keep staff.
  • Join together when we are training staff.
  • We could work together to share best practice, agree standards and targets.

Learn from each other in terms of what is working and what isn’t working so we can better help the people who use our services.

2.Maternity Services

We are looking at ways that we could work together to run maternity services. We think it might be useful to:

  • Work together to share best practice, agree standards and targets
  • Give women more choice about where they have their baby. For example, giving more women the chance to have their baby at home.
  • All hospitals would have specially trained midwives that look after women giving birth
  • Most ‘low risk’, women giving birth are seen by midwives and not doctors so because of this, we think we could change one or two of our units into midwife only units.
  • More ‘high risk’ women would be cared for in centres where specialist doctors are available if they needed more specialised care. This does mean that some women may need to travel a bit further but they would have access to specialist doctors who are there all the time.

3. Services for poorly children

We are looking at ways that we could work together. Most children can be cared for at home, or only stay in hospital for a few hours and can go home very quickly. There are a small number of children who are seriously ill and need to stay in hospital for longer. We think it might be useful to:

  • Care for more children at home or “in the community”.
  • Look after seriously ill children in units with more specialist doctors, nurses and healthcare staff.
  • Look to see if children who are less ill should be cared for in units which are open during the day. All our hospitals would have children’s units that were open during the day. One or two of them would not open overnight.
  • Learn from each other in terms of what is working and what isn’t working so we can better help the people who use our services.

4. Gastroenterology (stomach and intestine) services

We are looking at ways that we could work together to offer services for people who have a “gastric bleed” which means they are vomiting blood and need to be seen by specialist teams. At the moment we don’t have enough specialist staff to provide these services at nights and at weekends on all of our sites. We think it might be useful to:

  • Look at lowering the number of hospitals who can treat this over the night and at weekends to three or four sites (instead of the current seven). This way we can make sure that the specialist staff are in these places to treat people in a better way.

5. Stroke services

We are looking at ways that we could work together to run Stroke Services. We think it might be useful to:

  • Make sure all hospitals have the same way of working to make sure people are supported in being well enough to go home with the right follow up care and rehabilitation in place
  • Make sure all hospitals work together to look after patients who have had “mini-strokes” (what we call TIAs)
  • Set up a network (group) so that specialist stroke doctors who look after people during the first 72 hours after having a stroke in hyper acute stroke units will support the hospitals who don’t offer this emergency service

About you

To make sure the replies we receive are balanced across our population, we would appreciate it if you would let us know about yourself. Your response will be completely anonymous.